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The challenge

Unilever’s health soap brand, Lifebuoy, needed a creative solution to convince low-income families to wash their hands regularly. It’s an effective disease-prevention strategy, and aligned with Lifebuoy’s health-focused brand associations in the developing world. A series of narrative journeys, written from the perspective of mothers in Cape Town, Sao Paulo and northern India, helped us map out a comprehensive hand hygiene program, providing web, mobile and print-based tools centred on a recurring annual event.

The solution

Global Handwashing Day (GHD) launched on 15 October, 2008—a partnership led by the United Nations that involves NGOs, schools and companies in more than 70 countries. The narrative journeys we created enabled Lifebuoy to create a series of GHD communication tools to go with it, tailored for maximum accessibility. Not only are they helping families improve health outcomes, they’re also boosting one of Unilever’s flagship brands throughout the developing world.

Created while Victoria Kirk-Owal was at Ogilvy.


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The challenge

How do you take the confusing task of buying private medical services and make it more intuitive? And how do you take the guilt and sting out of shopping for elder care?

Drawing on extensive customer and stakeholder interviews, we identified key archetypes among likely service users, and their differing needs in terms of information and experience. This led to a map of crucial UX and content features that would bring the entire experience, online and offline, together into a coherent whole.

The solution

A series of customer narratives detailing every aspect of a new service offering unprecedented levels of insurance customisation. Deliverables included visual user journeys, service maps, content plans, and recommendations for online chat and direct interaction with BUPA staff, to help with plan selection and customer service.

Created while Victoria Kirk-Owal was at Ogilvy.


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The challenge

The editors at WIRED challenged us to redesign the most mundane, overlooked activity we could think of. So we picked personal shipping. Starting with the observation that most shipping tasks are simply information management, we asked what it would look like if all that data were made digital, and how that could transform the experience. A mixed team of visual, industrial, and interaction designers collaborated under a central guiding narrative to show how it might work.

The solution

The Signet concept replaces stamps, addresses and trips to the post office with a single, beautiful laser-etched seal and app. This enables a service that moves the entire informational part of shipping online, making a package as easy to send as a text message. Featured in WIRED, Fast Company and MSNBC.

Created while Carl Alviani was at Ziba.


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The challenge

International development efforts that educate and empower girls consistently give better outcomes than those that don’t—the numbers back it up. But to convince NGOs and government agencies in developing countries, our client—an international humanitarian organization—needed more than just data. Starting with donor and stakeholder interviews, we developed narratives to pinpoint their varied goals and perceptions, and plotted a path for bringing them into alignment.

The solution

A “workshop in a box”, that the organization can use wherever potential partners are, to run a one- to two-day event that gets the right people discussing and collaborating. Besides building trust, it also invites participants to learn firsthand about the value of girls’ empowerment, from program veterans who’ve benefited from it directly.

Created while Carl Alviani was at Ziba.


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The challenge

“Digital Whiteboard.” It sounds shiny and futuristic, but would it actually work in a real classroom? That’s the question our client, a Fortune 100 tech company, needed to answer for a wide range of internal stakeholders and potential partners. They had the technology, and early prototypes, but not much in the way of use cases. We responded with an intensive storytelling project, combining live action video, animation, and dozens of prototype interactions.

The solution

A series of two- to five-minute video prototypes, showing how a real teacher might use this technology to teach math and science, and how students could benefit from its unique interactive learning patterns. Supplementary stories also explained in vivid terms the future potential of the technology, and why it’s worth long-term investment.

Created while Carl Alviani was at Ziba.